Skip to main content

Not Dreaming of Cake (or anything else)

It's 5 am and here I am...on the computer. This is getting to be a routine. Yesterday was the first day of my last dexamethasone cycle for the month and my blood sugar levels were through the roof - 26 at lunch and 23 at dinner. By bedtime (after a two-hour snooze on the couch) it had dropped off to 15.6. So it was an insulin-filled or fuelled day yesterday. We'll see how today is headed, when I take my blood sugar reading before breakfast.


Almost finished my book - "The Black Book" by theTurkish Nobel-winner Orhan Pamuk. I must say as difficult as it was to get into, and as repetative as it seemed to be at the start, it nevertheless has proven to be an interesting read overall. The pace of it all is a little slow for me, but I find in moments when I'm not reading it, I'm thinking about it, about different aspects and developments and stories within stories. I can see the author put a lot of time and thought into writing this. The Times Literary Supplement calls this "Pamuk's masterpiece." Not a bad endorsement.


Today's a very big day around here. It's Mikayil's 1st birthday. Maryse and I are off this afternoon to Megan and Selo's for the big event. We got Miko a big red wagon. It'll be interesting to see how he responds to it all - and according to his mother it will be the first time he's ever had cake.

Me and my diabetes, I'll have to pass (ha, it'll be the first time I haven't had cake.)


Looking 'birthday cakes" up on Wikpedia, it says: "The birthday cake has been an integral part of the birthday tradition in Western cultures since the middle of the 19th century.
The cake, or sometimes a pastry or dessert, is served to a person on his or her birthday, and is often decorated with small novelty candles, with the person's name and/or a message of congratulations inscribed with icing. The phrase "Happy Birthday" did not appear on birthday cakes until the song Happy Birthday to You was popularized in the early 1900s.

Tradition holds that the person with the birthday may make a wish, which will come true if all the candles can be blown out in one breath. As with Christmas puddings there are various traditions of coins or Touch Pieces being added for good luck."


Everything you need to know, right here on this blog.

Book: see above

Music: The Kinks - "Waterloo Sunset" from The Kinks - The Ultimate Collection

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

My Back Pages - October

Well, folks, I read seven (count 'em) seven books in October. One I didn't finish but even at that I hit the magic number 50 I estimated for myself by the end of the year. The six books I successfully waded through were, firstly, What Happened, Hillary Clinton's book on her bid for the Presidency. I''m a bit of a political junkie so I get off on this stuff but still it kinda struck me as one long whine over losing.
Next up was the excellent Canyon of Dreams: The Magic and Music of Laurel Canyon. Laurel Canyon was the fabled area outside of Los Angeles where many musicians and artists lived. Known as a 60s enclave, the book takes a look at just who lived there over the last 80 years. A fascinating read.
Next up was Lightfoot, a biography of Canadian folk singer Gordon Lightfoot. He may have been responsible for some iconic folk songs but he was also quite the womanizer and boozer. Enough said.
Then I read Dan Brown's new tome Origin, the fifth in the Robert Lan…

Tales From The Supermarket

Bob and Brenda worked in the supermarket. They weren't check-out clerks. And they weren't stock-boys. Brenda sure wasn't. And they weren't employees who worked in the fish section or the deli. No. They were on the shelves.

They hadn't been on the shelves very long but in that short time they'd developed a considerably close friendship.

The chatted all day when the store was busy and at night when the store was closed. They talked about everything. The talked about what raw products they came from. The talked about their manufacturing processes. And they talked about the long routes in semi-trailers that brought them to this store.

Oddly enough the one thing they never made clear to one another was just what product each of them was.

One day when Brenda was commenting on their friendship she told Bob she was grateful for their amity. "Are you Tea?" said Bob, pekoe-ing her way. "I thought I was Tea". You're coffee!"

This week's Tw…