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Getting Ahead


Harold had heard the theories. He'd read about them on the internet, He'd discussed them in chat rooms. He'd brewed about them as he tried to fall asleep each night. All he knew was the truth was out there. He was convinced of it. Hell, there were countless televisions dramas and documentaries devoted to it. Intelligent life existed other than that found on earth.

Brix and Aberdash laughed. The two alien heads had been monitoring Harold for some time now, noting his increased sense of paranoia. I say heads because they headed up their alien society... of heads. That's right, that's all they were. These two were bereft of bodies. As were the members of their nation. You could say Brix and Aberdash were head Heads. You could. But I wouldn't go for such a cheap laugh. They watched closely as Harold made a trip to the corner store and spent the evening making a tin-foil hat. A tin-foil hat wasn't going to do anything. If Brix and Aberdash wanted to suck out his brain tin-foil wasn't going to stop them. But they didn't want his brain. It was minuscule compared to theirs. And the knowledge it held was useless. All song titles and movie characters. It couldn't begin to grasp the magnitude of knowledge their craniums were composed of.

So after weeks of observation Brix and Aberdash were able to suss that Harold would be of little use to them. The tin-foil hat alone demonstrated that.

The two alien head heads comforted themselves with the fact that ttheir wo heads were better than one; that they'd put their heads together to figure this out; that they'd gone to the head of the class, as it were; that they'd given this some deep thought and gotten their heads around the problem; that they'd not had their heads in the sand; that they'd kept their heads above water; that they didn't fall head over heels and, naturally, they'd addressed the situation head-on.

Hmm. I think I'll quit while I'm ahead.

The Studio30+ prompt this week is suss/grasp and I managed to use both words. Head on back and find them.



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